1. A Day in LLS History

    On October 20, 1944, Robert “Robbie” Roesler de Villiers was only 16 years old when he died from leukemia. Robbie’s parents, Rudolph and Antoinette, were stricken with grief and frustrated by the lack of effective treatments for what was then considered a hopeless disease. After five years of mourning their son, they started a fundraising and education organization in his name. The Robert Roesler de Villiers Foundation had only a few volunteers and a tiny budget. At that time, the...

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  2. LLS Committed to National Cancer Moonshot

    Today, Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot announced a new series of commitments from federal agencies, private, philanthropic, and academic sectors, and the patient advocacy community, to accelerate cancer research progress and bring the most promising science and clinical developments to cancer patients quickly. I have the honor of attending today’s Cancer Moonshot events in Washington, D.C., in support of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s unrelenting commitment...

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  3. Caregiver Spotlight: Using Writing to Heal and Cope

    Caregiving can cause a roller coaster of emotions that change over time. Finding time and outlets to cope is not always easy. Dr. Robert Winn, medical director of Deer Valley and The Canyons in Park City, knows this struggle all too well. Life was near perfect for Dr. Winn and his beloved wife Nancy. When Nancy was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), their world went tumbling out of control. Dr. Winn could not speak of Nancy's illness without getting choked up or crying, so to commun...

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  4. Light the Night – A Chance to Celebrate, Honor, and Connect

    Hi LLS Community! We would like to call your attention to our Light the Night walks, currently taking place all across the country. This is a great opportunity to get to know other patients and caregivers and to celebrate survivorship. These events are open to the public. Upcoming this weekend: 10/20/2016 Boston, MA – The Boston Commons Omaha, NE – Stinson Park at Aksarben Village Greer, SC – BMW Performance Center 10/21/2016 Athens, GA – The Classic Cent...

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  5. To Be Or Not To Be A Vegetarian

    By Margaret Martin, RD, MS, LDN, Licensed Dietitian and Nutritionist; Certified Diabetes Educator, PearlPoint Cancer Support Many times when I speak with people who are just diagnosed with cancer, they want to change their diet immediately. I get it. They want control over something in their life when suddenly everything seems out of control. Everyone else is asking for their time, setting doctors’ appointments, and scheduling imaging and laboratory tests. Cancer survivors may tu...

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  6. Stop The Problem Before It Starts: Lymphedema Prevention

    By Abby Henry, Oncology Content Manager, PearlPoint Cancer Support ​Lymphedema is a common side effect among cancer survivors, but it can affect any patient whose treatment plan included lymph nodes being removed by surgery or lymph nodes being damaged by radiation treatment. Lymphedema is a swelling in the arms, legs, or other parts of the body caused by a build-up of extra lymphatic fluid. Lymphatic fluid cannot flow through the body normally if lymph nodes are removed or damage...

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  7. Researcher Q&A: Christopher Cogle, M.D., University of Florida

    Christopher Cogle, M.D., Professor of Medicine, University of Florida, Pierre Chagnon Professor of Stem Cell Biology and Bone Marrow Transplant, is the recipient of an LLS Scholar in Clinical Research grant through our Career Development Program. He also has a project supported through LLS’s Therapy Acceleration Program. Dr. Cogle explains his work advancing an investigational approach to treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

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  8. A Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivor’s “New Normal”

    My life with cancer began five days before my wedding when I was 25 years old. On August 2, 2004, I was at a family birthday party when I felt a lump protruding out of my neck. After the party, I rushed over to see my stepdad who is a doctor. Although he knew that the position of the lump at my age was not a good sign, he calmed me down and gave me antibiotics. After months of planning for the wedding, he knew how important it was for me to walk down the aisle. On our wedding day, Augus...

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  9. Epigenetics: A New Tool for Precision Medicine

    Christopher Vakoc, M.D., Ph.D., leads a team of researchers being funded through LLS’s Career Development Program. At Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, N.Y., Vakoc works in an area of science called epigenetics – the study of chemical changes that switch genes on and off to control cell behavior. What is epigenetics? Epigenetics is arguably one of the fastest-moving fields of cancer research. In the cancer field, it refers to the mechanisms of gene control. Essential...

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  10. World-Renowned Chef & Cancer Survivor Cooks for a Cure

    Shortly before Steve McHugh and his wife moved to San Antonio in 2010, the rising star chef was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and spent a year undergoing eight rounds of chemotherapy. “Chemotherapy was a real roller coaster – I experienced insomnia, constipation and dizzy spells. There were times I would not sleep for three to four days,” he said. During treatment, he was in the middle of moving to San Antonio and helping to open a new restaurant. Between managing constructi...

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