1. A Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivor’s “New Normal”

    My life with cancer began five days before my wedding when I was 25 years old. On August 2, 2004, I was at a family birthday party when I felt a lump protruding out of my neck. After the party, I rushed over to see my stepdad who is a doctor. Although he knew that the position of the lump at my age was not a good sign, he calmed me down and gave me antibiotics. After months of planning for the wedding, he knew how important it was for me to walk down the aisle. On our wedding day, Augus...

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  2. Epigenetics: A New Tool for Precision Medicine

    Christopher Vakoc, M.D., Ph.D., leads a team of researchers being funded through LLS’s Career Development Program. At Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, N.Y., Vakoc works in an area of science called epigenetics – the study of chemical changes that switch genes on and off to control cell behavior. What is epigenetics? Epigenetics is arguably one of the fastest-moving fields of cancer research. In the cancer field, it refers to the mechanisms of gene control. Essential...

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  3. World-Renowned Chef & Cancer Survivor Cooks for a Cure

    Shortly before Steve McHugh and his wife moved to San Antonio in 2010, the rising star chef was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and spent a year undergoing eight rounds of chemotherapy. “Chemotherapy was a real roller coaster – I experienced insomnia, constipation and dizzy spells. There were times I would not sleep for three to four days,” he said. During treatment, he was in the middle of moving to San Antonio and helping to open a new restaurant. Between managing constructi...

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  4. Childhood Cancer Awareness Month: Late Effects

    By Abby Henry, Oncology Content Manager, PearlPoint Cancer Support September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Adult survivors of childhood cancer may still deal with the late effects of cancer and cancer treatment years after their last treatment. The late effects of childhood cancer can include many different parts of the body and differ from person to person. Predominately the risk of late effects depends on the following: Type of cancer Specific treatments received Age...

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  5. Choosing Treatment for YOUR Myeloma

    With more multiple myeloma (MM) treatments being approved and personalized for myeloma patients, Drs. Gareth Morgan, Faith Davies, and Frits van Rhee, from the UAMS Myeloma Institute discuss the expanding armamentarium.

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  6. LLS is Coming to You! 2016 Blood Cancer Conferences

    We are in your neighborhood! Here’s where you can catch us throughout the year at The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) Blood Cancer Conferences! LLS Blood Cancer Conferences are free education events for blood cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, family members and healthcare professionals to learn more about treatment options, emerging therapies, management of survivorship issues and LLS resources. Click on your state for more information, as it becomes available: ...

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  7. The Check-Up: Appointment Anxiety

    By Abby Henry, Oncology Content Manager, PearlPoint Cancer Support While going through cancer treatment, I became very familiar with the treatment center. I knew the best places to park and that the vending machines are around the corner from the bathroom. At every appointment, the same friendly receptionist greeted me with a smile from behind her desk sign that read, “HOPE: Having only positive expectations.” A familiar nurse stuck me with an IV, reassuring me that she’s known a...

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  8. Advancing a Treatment for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    In April we featured a Q&A in this blog with LLS-funded researcher Anthony Letai, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who discussed in his work leading to clinical trials of a drug called venetoclax (Venclexta ®) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The drug was FDA approved in April for a high-risk form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). AML is a deadly blood cancer that has seen no change in the standard of care in 40 years. More than 20,000 people a year are diagnosed with A...

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