1. FDA Update: Recent Approvals Benefit Blood Cancer Patients

    Ibrutinib just became the latest therapy for blood cancers to receive an expanded approval use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Such therapeutic advances have been making great progress in recent months and a number of investigational agents – first approved for one disease and population – are being expanded to new uses. Almost 300 drugs for blood cancers are currently in clinical trials or awaiting FDA review.

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  2. My Myeloma Story

    “What is multiple myeloma?” Those were my words after the doctor’s review of my lab results for a routine and random high blood pressure exam in November 2008. I had always been healthy, had never been in the hospital, never even broken a bone. I was in great shape: a 46-year-old high school biology teacher, head softball and volleyball coach, with a beautiful young family including two teenage daughters. I got not only cancer, but an incurable form of cancer. The diagnosis was confi...

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  3. Looking Ahead: LLS Panel Highlights Trends and Advances

    The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society recently brought together a world-renowned panel of thought leaders to discuss the latest advances and insights into blood cancer research and treatment, drug costs and patient access, and patient advocacy and policy. “There’s never a good time to get cancer but this is a phenomenal time to be fighting it,” said Louis J. DeGennaro, president and CEO of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS).

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  4. Leading Researchers, Clinicians, Policy and Drug Development Experts, and Cancer Survivors Convene to Discuss Latest Advances and Challenges in Treating Blood Cancers

    Click here for a comprehensive media toolkit. New York – February 25, 2016 – A panel of world renowned thought leaders from research, clinical practice, policymaking, pharmaceutical industry and patient advocacy convened today to discuss and debate the latest advances and insights into blood cancer research and treatment, drug costs and patient access, and patient advocacy and policy. The roundtable was organized by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), the world's largest volunta...

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  5. Coming Soon: A Brave New World

    Research is inching us closer to cures for blood cancer every day – among them, therapies that unleash the immune system, reprogramming of T-cells to track down cancer cells, and personalized treatments based on a patient’s genetic make-up. Survival rates for patients with many blood cancers have doubled, tripled and even quadrupled since the early 1960s. Cures for many patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and Hodgkin lymphoma have been achieved, and the five-year survival ...

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  6. Seven Insights for Better Nutrition During Cancer Treatment

    In the New Year, you may be looking to turn over a new leaf. One goal may be to improve your nutrition. Many cancer survivors struggle with food issues. In fact, research shows that up to 80 percent of people with a cancer diagnosis are expected to experience malnutrition at some point during treatment. Even before a diagnosis, as many as 40 percent of people with cancer experience unhealthy weight loss. Unhealthy weight loss can lead to decreased response to treatment, delays in treatment, a...

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  7. Moving Cancer to the Back Burner

    I am glad to be here. Literally. Being a survivor is a good thing. I could have been six feet under, after being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) on December 16, 2000. I was 40 years old, raising two children with my husband Ron. Our daughter was almost 4 years old and our son was 16 months. After I was diagnosed, I spoke with a survivor through The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s First Connection program. Hearing her voice on the phone gave me so much hope. She was...

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  8. Remembering Cancer with a Tattoo, New Career and Anniversary Party

    In Jon Christoffersen’s house, important occasions - such as the end of chemotherapy - are worthy of great celebration. First it was a tattoo to mark the beginning and end of his treatment, and now, on his 10-year anniversary of being cancer free, it’s time to party. A house party complete with toast in his honor and a “%&#%$# Cancer” cake marked the occasion in December for Christoffersen, who had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) when he was a teenager. He's now 29. Althoug...

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  9. Renewed focus on a national initiative to cure cancer

    For more than 66 years The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) has dedicated its energy and resources to finding cures for blood cancers, investing more than $1 billion over that time. Last night in his State of the Union address, President Obama appointed Vice President Joe Biden to take the lead in a “moon shot” mission to cure cancer. We at LLS agree the time is right. “It’s personal for everybody,” the Vice President later said in a statement. As Vice President Biden...

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