1. Moving Cancer to the Back Burner

    I am glad to be here. Literally. Being a survivor is a good thing. I could have been six feet under, after being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) on December 16, 2000. I was 40 years old, raising two children with my husband Ron. Our daughter was almost 4 years old and our son was 16 months. After I was diagnosed, I spoke with a survivor through The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s First Connection program. Hearing her voice on the phone gave me so much hope. She was...

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  2. Remembering Cancer with a Tattoo, New Career and Anniversary Party

    In Jon Christoffersen’s house, important occasions - such as the end of chemotherapy - are worthy of great celebration. First it was a tattoo to mark the beginning and end of his treatment, and now, on his 10-year anniversary of being cancer free, it’s time to party. A house party complete with toast in his honor and a “%&#%$# Cancer” cake marked the occasion in December for Christoffersen, who had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) when he was a teenager. He's now 29. Althoug...

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  3. Renewed focus on a national initiative to cure cancer

    For more than 66 years The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) has dedicated its energy and resources to finding cures for blood cancers, investing more than $1 billion over that time. Last night in his State of the Union address, President Obama appointed Vice President Joe Biden to take the lead in a “moon shot” mission to cure cancer. We at LLS agree the time is right. “It’s personal for everybody,” the Vice President later said in a statement. As Vice President Biden...

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  4. Huge Win for Cancer Research

    Congress has approved a $2 billion increase in funding for the National Institutes of Health. The 6.6 percent hike -- to $32.1 billion -- is the largest increase in 12 years and it will make an enormous difference in supporting cancer research in the years ahead. The bill includes a $264 million increase in funding for the National Cancer Institute (boosting NCI funding for the year to $5.2 billion – a 5.3% increase) as well as $200 million in funding for a precision medicine initiative ...

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  5. Looking Ahead to 2016

    LLS CEO and President Louis J. DeGennaro speaks out about coming off a “phenomenal” year and what we can look forward to in 2016. He shares his optimism about a future with no chemotherapy, the use of the word “cure,” the increasing promise of immunotherapy, and the potential of having hundreds of compounds in development. Six top topics that will be important for blood cancer patients and families: Precision Medicine. We’re continuing the track toward precision medicine, w...

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  6. Surviving Leukemia: Now My Brother Lives Inside of Me

    Well, times were dark indeed Feeling my body betrayed me Life was good. My wife Bonnie and I were settling into a lifestyle that was becoming less demanding and more fun. Our only son was about to graduate college. My son and I were making music together and playing some local clubs and bars. I was physically active and worked out regularly. I had recently made changes to my diet due to a history of slightly high cholesterol and was curious to see what effect (if any) it would have...

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  7. Finding a New Normal

    So you’re in remission and you can officially call yourself a cancer survivor. Congratulations for making it through the hardest part of the journey. Now you may be thinking “What comes next?” Most people don’t think about survivorship until they finish treatment. And it’s only much later, when there hasn’t been a recurrence and they’re not thinking about the cancer so much, that they really contemplate long-term survival. At that point, there can be many questions: What can ...

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  8. #ASH15 Day 4: Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Novel Immunotherapy

    Yesterday we learned the exciting news that the FDA has granted Breakthrough Therapy designation for an investigational immunotherapy LLS is supporting through our Therapy Acceleration Program (TAP). The therapy, KTE-C19, being developed by Kite Pharma, is another example of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), an approach that genetically engineers patients’ immune T cells and reintroduces them into the body to kill cancer cells. KTE-C19 is crafted by removing patients' T cells and geneti...

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  9. The First Official Day of #ASH15

    Beat AML is a collaboration launched nearly three years ago by LLS and the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), to go on the offenensive against acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a blood cancer with a poor prognosis and little change in the standard of care in 40 years. More than a dozen abstracts from the first phase of the initiative will be featured throughout the American Society of Hematology (#ASH15) Annual Meeting in Orlando over the next few days. #...

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